Columbia SC Landscapers | Blade & Petal Landscaping Call 803.254.0818

Columbia's SC Landscaper of Choice


Leave a comment

Flower Beds

 

For more details about designing and installation, please go to the “Services Offered” at the top right

 

 

When it comes to flower garden design, Blade and Petal can assist and listen to your thought and plans. Sure, it’s important to do a good job of soil preparation and carefully match plants to the site. If you ignore these imperatives, your results will likely be disappointing. Columbia has a great environment to support a large selection Annual and Perennial flowers. A beautifully planned flower beds is the compliment of a professionally maintained lawn.

The aesthetics, however, are more a matter of personal preference. You might prefer a formal look with straight edged beds and plants in orderly patterns. Or you might prefer a more natural look with sweeping curves and irregular clumps of plants. The styles you choose are up to you.

The tips below avoid as much as possible the prescriptive “shoulds” that dominate advice about garden design. Instead, they’ll point out the aesthetic consequences of different strategies. Remember that, in most cases, there is more than one way to arrange plants, and that many of the “rules” of garden design were made to be broken.  Blade and Petal listens to your ideas and builds on our professional experience to create the perfect flower beds.  We know that what’s important is that your garden to exceed your expectations.


Leave a comment

Shrub, Hedges and Bushes

Trimming hedges is one of the least enjoyable gardening jobs. Apparently, its right down there with weeding and composting as people’s least favorite chores, with most clients rating it a tedious job. Blade and Petal Landscaping utilizes the right equipment and knowledgeable crew.

A hedge becomes thick as a result of regular trimming where each cut gives rise to a branch. Hedges need more than just annual trimming — you must pay attention to watering and feeding, and to the control of pests, diseases and disorders if they are to remain healthy and attractive.

Watering is necessary during dry spells in the growing season — hedging plants are generally spaced much closer than other garden plants and so their roots compete heavily for water. You can use a garden hose or sprinkler, but the most effective method is to lay a seep hose along the base of the hedge. Apply enough water to saturate the top 15cm (6in) of soil — equivalent to 2.5cm (1in) of rainfall — at each application and repeat whenever the top 2.5cm (1in) of soil is dry.

Mulching annually with forest bark around the roots of a hedge will help to prevent undue water loss from the soil.

Feeding should be carried out regularly. Apply a general-purpose fertilizer, such as bone meal, at the rate of a generous handful per sq m/yd in spring as a soil dressing. Treat a strip up to 90cm (3ft) wide from the base of the hedge and hoe the fertilizer into the surface 2.5cm (1in). Water it in if the soil is dry.

If the root run of the hedge is under turf or paving, then apply nutrients as a foliar feed from a pressure sprayer. Use a liquid fertilizer which is rich in nitrogen for leaf growth. Repeat whenever the foliage appears dull and lacking vigor. Foliage sprays can also be applied as a mid to late season back-up to the main spring soil dressing.

Weeding Around the Bottom of Hedging Plants

Eliminate weeds from the base of a hedge using a draw hoe, by hand or with chemical sprays. Weeds compete with the hedge for nutrients, water and light so remove them before they begin to accumulate.

Water-soluble diquat and paraquat weed killers are effective against most weeds under a hedge, but avoid wetting the leaves of the hedge. Glyphosate in liquid or gel form is ideal for killing persistent perennial and annual weeds.

Cutting out dead wood is another vital task. Branches often die out in the center of an established hedge. These should be pruned away since they can harbor diseases such as coral spot which soon spread through the entire hedge. Make clean cuts with secateurs back to healthy wood. This is best done during the growing season when live wood is clearly visible.

If a whole plant dies out within a hedge, grub it out and replace with a young specimen after first preparing and conditioning the soil as for planting a new hedge.

Pests and diseases should be treated as for other garden shrubs and trees. Healthy plants are resistant; use chemicals with care and discretion.